Think You’re Too Old For Orthodontics? Think Again!

Do you think orthodontics are only for children or teens? Think again! Now, more than ever, adults are looking for orthodontic treatment for a variety of reasons. Some people want to improve their smiles or correct their bites, other people are seeking to improve their health or to boost their self-esteem. Today, well over a million Americans over the age of 18 wear braces, per the Academy of General Dentistry.

Every day adults are getting braces, even celebrities. Country music singer Faith Hill wore braces to the Grammy Awards in 2013, when she was 45 years old. And when he was 40 years old, Tom Cruise wore ceramic brackets to improve his teeth. In our suburban offices, about 25 percent of our patients are adults. But in our downtown San Diego office,  a lot of  of our patients are adults, which means you won’t have to worry about being the only adult in our office getting work done on your teeth. Our San Diego orthodontic office has 30 years’experience in the smile industry.

  1. Adults should get orthodontics because every smile is important.

Your smile is one of the first things people notice. When you smile, you can have a positive impact on the people around you. But if you’re afraid to smile or you try to cover your teeth when you grin, you won’t have the same effect. Maybe you’ve always had crooked teeth, but you could get orthodontics when you were younger. Or maybe they’ve just recently started to get crooked. Maybe you have serious jaw pain or are having trouble cleaning your teeth properly.

Many people say their crooked or unattractive teeth are holding them back from living life to the fullest. Your oral health can impact your ability to get a job and can have a direct impact on your social life. Why not explore orthodontics and fix your mouth now? The results will amaze you, and you’ll no longer feel self-conscious about your teeth in the future.

  1. Adults should consider orthodontics because teeth can move at any age, even if they are healthy.

Teeth can shift at any age. Maybe due to an injury, a health condition, or simply natural growth. Perhaps you had straight teeth in the past, but are now facing a crooked and overcrowded smile. Even if you had braces in the past, you may need them again. Why? Some people have mouths that change naturally. Other people neglect to wear their retainers as much as they should. Orthodontists now tell people to wear retainers much longer than they recommended in previous decades. Some people even need to wear one for life.

  1. Adults should get orthodontics because today, orthodontic options are better, cheaper, and less noticeable.

Braces have changed over the years. Today, wearing braces is less painful and requires less time. Almost all our adult braces patients are happy they made the commitment to correct their teeth. No longer do you need to suffer the embarrassment of being a metal mouth. The brackets used today are smaller and bands that wrap around the tooth are no longer used. Ceramic braces are popular with adults due to their cosmetic appeal because they are made of a translucent (clear) material.

Maybe your parents couldn’t afford braces when you were growing up, but now you can. Many medical and dental insurance plans cover part of the cost. Or maybe you make enough money to save and pay for orthodontics out of pocket. Our orthodontic office in San Diego offers many financing options to accommodate your needs, and we would be happy to go over these with you. We can also review your insurance policy and help you maximize your benefit and file your claims.

  1. Adults should get orthodontics to avoid serious problems with their teeth and mouth.

Study has shown that the frequency of misalignment in adults is comparable to the frequency in children and teens. When you have a cross bite or misaligned teeth, you have an increased chance of plaque and food buildup between your teeth. This means you may get periodontal disease or gum disease. You can also possibly avoid tooth decay, gum and bone loss, irregular wear of the tooth enamel, and TMJ/TMD pain (or chronic facial discomfort). Also, if you’re thinking about getting dental implants, the rest of your teeth will need to be straight first, so you’ll want to get orthodontics before you can consider that treatment option.

  1. Adults should consider orthodontics because people are living longer.

People are living longer, and many people are keeping their teeth for life, so it makes sense to pay the price to straighten crooked or crowded teeth. Even older adults are getting braces. Per the American Association of Orthodontists, more and more people who are in their 60s, 70s, and 80s are using braces.

Are you ready to smile a lot more? What’s holding you back from getting braces as an adult? If you have trouble biting, chewing, or speaking, or you have teeth that are crowded or protruding, why haven’t you decided to explore orthodontics yet? Are you worried about the pain? Improvements in technology make the process of getting braces much more gentle and pain is no longer a question. Adults often do a better job caring for their orthodontic appliances and following the instruction of their orthodontist, which means their results can be more impressive than those of a child or teen.

Tooth, teeth, oral pain. What is it?

Symptom: Sensitivity to hot or cold foods and liquids.

 

Possible problem: If discomfort lasts only moments, sensitivity generally does not signal a serious problem. It may be caused by; a small area of decay in a tooth, a loose filling or an exposed root surface resulting from gum recession and possibly toothbrush abrasion.

What to do: If a root surface is sensitive, keep it clean and free of dental bacterial plaque. Use a soft toothbrush, cleaning very gently at the gum line, and brush no more than twice daily. Try using fluoride-containing toothpaste made for sensitive teeth. You can even try using toothpaste like an ointment, rubbing it into the root surface for ten minutes or so at a time. If the sensitivity continues, see your dentist.

Symptom: Sensitivity to hot or cold foods after dental treatment.

 

Possible problem: Dental work may result in tooth sensitivity due to inflammation of the pulp tissues inside a tooth.

What to do: This sensitivity should last no longer then a few days; however, if decay has recently been removed or a filling or crown recently has been placed, a tooth may take a week or two to settle. Mild pain relievers like acetaminophen, aspirin or ibuprofen should help. If the pain persists or worsens, see your dentist.

Symptom: Sharp pain when biting down on food.

 

Possible problem: Decay, a loose filling and/or a cracked tooth are possible causes.

What to do: See a dentist to diagnose the problem before the pain worsens. Decay will need to be removed, and a loose filling replaced by your dentist. If the pain is caused by pulp tissue damage, your dentist may send you to an endodontist (“endo” – inside; “dont” – tooth), a specialist who will perform a root canal treatment to clean out the damaged pulp, disinfect the root canal and fill and seal the remaining space to save the tooth. A cracked tooth may be difficult to treat not only if it involves the pulp, but also depending on the location and depth of the crack. (See the Dear Doctormagazine article on “Cracked Tooth Syndrome”)

Symptom: Lingering pain after eating hot or cold foods and liquids.

 

Possible problem: This probably means the pulp is inflamed and/or dying, and may be irreversibly damaged usually as a result of deep decay or physical trauma.

What to do: See your dentist or endodontist to diagnose the problem before the pain becomes severe due to the development of an abscess. The tooth will likely need root canal treatment to remove the dying or dead pulp tissue to save the tooth.

Floor of the sinus

Symptom: Dull ache and pressure in the upper teeth and sinus area of one or both sides.

 

Possible problem: Pain felt in the sinus area of the face is often associated with the upper back teeth because they share the same nerves. The origin of this “referred” pain consequently may be difficult to determine. Therefore, sinus pain can feel like tooth pain and vice versa. That’s why sinus congestion from a cold or flu can cause pain in the upper teeth. Additionally it’s also important to determine if clenching or grinding is a factor, as they too cause similar symptoms.

What to do: See your dentist or endodontist to find out if the symptoms are dentally related; otherwise, you may need to see your family physician. However, don’t wait until the pain worsens.

Schedule An Emergency Appointment: http://www.24-7emergencydental.com/

858.552.0052

 

 

 

Holiday Dental Care Tips

  1. Avoid Desserts and SweetsOkay well maybe don’t avoid the sweets. The party may offer a multitude of sugary snacks and holiday desserts, but don’t forget that drinks like eggnog, hot cocoa, punch and most liqueurs contain a high level of sugars. Take a quick trip to the restroom and brush. By limiting your consumption, you can deter unwanted tooth decay while reducing any harmful effects to your waistline.
  2. Try Not to StressIf the season is stressing you out, you may find yourself grinding or clinching your teeth during stressful situations and often while you sleep. This can cause headaches and jaw pain, as well as damaged teeth and dental work. The best way to address this problem is to use a dental mouth guard, which won’t stop the grinding but can prevent it from causing pain.
  3. Don’t Forget Your ToothbrushHoliday parties with friends and family are about gathering together where lots of food and beverages are on hand. By bringing a toothbrush, toothpaste and dental floss, you can periodically excuse yourself to take care of your teeth. If you cannot do this, at least try to rinse your mouth with water between dinner courses or chew sugar-less gums.
  4. Have an Emergency Dental ContactThe wrong bite into a candy cane can result in a dental disaster. You may chip a tooth, lose a filling, or break a crown while on vacation or when the dentist’s office is closed. Contact Dr. Kasari’s office to see if they can provide you with emergency dental care over the holiday season.
  5. Take Care of Your TeethThe holiday fun can keep you distracted, but as long as your oral health care becomes a habit, you can continue the holiday fun without fretting about your teeth. Make a resolution to brush and floss regularly and schedule routine check ups with your dentist.

If you are in the San Diego area this season for the holidays we are here for all you’re emergency dental needs.

 

Toothache 101

A toothache is a pain in or around a tooth that may be caused by:

Symptoms of a toothache may include:

  • Tooth pain that may be sharp, throbbing, or constant. In some people, pain results only when pressure is applied to the tooth.
  • Swelling around the tooth
  • Fever or headache
  • Foul-tasting drainage from the infected tooth

    When Should I See a Dentist About a Toothache?

    See your dentist as soon as possible about your toothache if:

    • You have a toothache that lasts longer than 1 or 2 days
    • Your toothache is severe
    • You have a fever, earache, or pain upon opening your mouth wide

    Proper identification and treatment of dental infections is important to prevent its spread to other parts of the face and skull and possibly even to the bloodstream.

    What Happens When I Go to the Dentist for a Toothache?

    To treat your toothache, your dentist will first obtain your medical history and conduct a physical exam. He or she will ask you questions about the pain, such as when the pain started, how severe it is, where the pain is located, what makes the pain worse, and what makes it better. Your dentist will examine your mouth, teeth, gums, jaws, tongue, throat, sinuses, ears, nose, and neck. X-rays may be taken as well as other tests, depending on what your dentist suspects is causing your toothache.

    What Treatments Are Available for a Toothache?

    Treatment for a toothache depends on the cause. If a cavity is causing the toothache, your dentist will fill the cavity or possibly extract the tooth, if necessary. A root canal might be needed if the cause of the toothache is determined to be an infection of the tooth’s nerve. Bacteria that have worked their way into the inner aspects of the tooth cause such an infection. An antibiotic may be prescribed if there is fever or swelling of the jaw. Occasionally, phototherapy with a cold laser, usually in conjunction with another treatment, may be used to reduce the pain and inflammation associated with the toothache.

    How Can Toothaches Be Prevented?

    Since most toothaches are the result of tooth decay, following good oral hygiene practices can prevent toothaches. Good oral hygiene practices consist of brushing regularly with a fluoride-containing toothpaste, flossing once daily, rinsing once or twice a day with an antiseptic mouthwash, and seeing your dentist twice a year for professional cleaning. In addition to these practices, eat foods low in sugar and ask your dentist about sealants and fluoride applications.

Book Appointment today

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/guide/toothaches for more on toothaches

Dental Partials

Here at Dr. Kasari’s in San Diego Ca we offer Dental partials. A removable partial denture or bridge usually consists of replacement teeth attached to a pink or gum-colored plastic base, which is sometimes connected by metal framework that holds the denture in place in the mouth. Partial dentures are used when one or more natural teeth remain in the upper or lower jaw. A fixed bridge replaces one or more teeth by placing crowns on the teeth on either side of the space and attaching artificial teeth to them. This “bridge” is then cemented into place. Not only does a partial denture fill in the spaces created by missing teeth, it prevents other teeth from changing position. A precision partial denture is removable and has internal attachments rather than clasps that attach to the adjacent crowns. This is a more natural-looking appliance. For more info about your options give us a call today and schedule a free consultation (858) 552-0052.

Braces & Options

Visible Braces

The choices: Anything fixed on the front of the tooth. This could mean traditional metal wires with stainless-steel brackets, metal wires with clear plastic brackets, or metal wires with tooth-colored ceramic brackets.

The pros: Traditional braces are often suggested to fix more severe alignment problems, such as a turned tooth, because they have a better grip on it. Dr Kasiri, whose office is located in San Diego Ca offers free orthodontic evaluations and can create the best perfect smile plan available to you.

The cons: These braces are completely visible. The brackets can cause discomfort and irritate the inside of the mouth for the first week or so until a patient adjusts. There are also issues with eating certain foods and keeping the teeth and braces clean. Clear brackets can stain. Treatment time for metal braces is typically longer, an average of 20 months, because cases tend to be more severe.

 

The choices: Lingual braces are placed completely behind the teeth. Incognito is one brand, as is Harmony, which uses digital technology to create a customized bracket-and-wire system.

The pros: No one can see you’re wearing braces. Because the brackets and wires are custom-made for each tooth, treatment is faster—on average, six months to a year—and requires fewer appointments. Harmony braces can also correct faulty bites with the addition of bite blocks.

The cons: Adjusting to this system can be a struggle. Much as with traditional metal braces, a patient has to avoid eating crunchy foods like carrots. Lingual braces also can cause a patient to speak with a lisp, at least for the first few weeks.  Constant contact between the brackets and the tongue can sometimes lead to irritation. Applying the braces is extremely technique-sensitive, so orthodontists have to be well trained.

For Questions and inquiry please don’t hesitate to call. (858) 552-0052

 

Original Story:

Tooth Fillings In San Diego Are Looking Shiny White

e popularity of a lily-white smile spawned a billion-dollar business for Procter & Gamble. For gold, it’s meant only more bad news.

Until a decade ago, about 67 metric tons of the yellow metal, worth $2.7 billion today, were filling, capping and crowning teeth worldwide annually. In the last five years, though, demand has plunged almost 60 percent, according to the World Gold Council, and dentists say it’s because of teeth-whitening.

The trend accelerated a decline in gold’s allure caused by newer dental cements and ceramics, and soaring bullion prices. The precious metal that’s surged in 2016 as investors rediscovered its virtue as a haven is now being shunned by ever-larger numbers of patients from Singapore to Sydney.

“We’re in a fad in dentistry where people have to have ‘triple-A, Dulux-white’ teeth,” said Hugo Sachs, 60, vice-president of the Australian Dental Association, who has been practicing dentistry for 37 years. “I doubt very much gold would come back into fashion.”

Gold demand in dentistry fell by 1 ton, or 5 percent, to 18.9 tons in 2015, the London-based Gold Council estimates.

“Long ago, having a gold tooth at the front was some kind of a status symbol,” said Chew Chong Lin, professor of prosthodontics at the National University of Singapore, who graduated from dental school in 1971. “As time went by, cosmetics took over and, therefore, people began wanting to have crowns with a more tooth-like appearance.”

Used by the Etruscans to make dental bridges as early as 630 BC, gold has been featuring in people’s mouths for millennia. In ancient times, women deliberately removed one or two incisors and replaced them with golden prosthetic ones, according to Marshall Joseph Becker, an emeritus professor of anthropology at the West Chester University of Pennsylvania.

Today’s dental patients prefer materials, such as ceramics, that blend, not clash, with their other teeth. And, thanks to lasers and bleach, pearly whites have seldom been whiter. P&G’s Crest Whitestrips, first sold in 2000, was “the largest product introduction in the history of” the 179-year-old multinational company, according to its lead inventor. Americans will this year spend $420.1 million on over-the-counter products to whiten their teeth, market researcher Euromonitor International predicts.

“We hardly ever use gold in front teeth now, almost never,” said Lindsay Richards, dean of dentistry at the University of Adelaide in South Australia, where he’s taught since 1982. “I would’ve last done a gold filling 10 years ago in a front tooth. For the back teeth, it’s still an excellent material, but people don’t like the look of it.”

As a crown for back teeth, gold is the strongest material and enables more of the existing tooth structure to be preserved, said Sachs, who practices in the rural townships of Harden and Cootamundra in New South Wales state. Unlike porcelain, gold doesn’t fracture.

“But people tend not to want to show gold, or for that matter silver, fillings these days, even though they are a very good tooth restorative,” he said.

Gold alloys that contain smaller amounts of silver, copper, palladium and other materials are especially resistant to plaque and cavities, making them one of the most durable materials for dental work, such as crowns, said R. Balakrishnan, who’s worked as a dentist in Malaysia’s capital city and the surrounding Selangor state for 40 years.

“Gold should make a comeback as far as posterior restorations are concerned,” Balakrishnan said. “When you have these crowns, they last you a lifetime.”

The precious metal is expensive, though. The price climbed every year from 2001 to 2012, reaching $1,921.17 an ounce on the spot market in 2011. It’s advanced 16 percent to $1,233.18 so far this year, according to Bloomberg generic pricing.

That means a patient needing a filling could get half a dozen composite resins for the price of a gold inlay in a front tooth, said Sachs, who last used gold to replace missing front-tooth structure 30 years ago.

A filling with a gold cap might use five to eight grams of the precious metal, Richards said. “You would have hundreds of dollars worth of gold in a gold crown, whereas it used to be tens of dollars,” he said. “That’s made a difference.”

Gold in dentistry accounts for less than 1 percent of global demand. More than half is fashioned into jewelry, while a fifth is kept as bars or coins as an investment, according to gold council data.

These days, gold teeth are more likely to be seen in the mouths of the older generation or of headline-grabbing celebrities, such as British deejay Goldie and Pogues singer Shane MacGowan. American rapper Nelly captured the appeal of bejeweled cosmetic dental apparatuses in his song “Grillz,” released more than a decade ago.

Those at least set them apart from teeth-whitening devotees.

“It’s horses for courses,” the Australian Dental Association’s Sachs said. “But everybody is walking around with the same colored smile — it loses a bit of character as far as I am concerned. For your free consultation Contact Us