Do you use an electric toothbrush?

Do you use an electric toothbrush? If not, what are you waiting for? If you’ve been on fence about switching to an electric toothbrush we’re here to help. Today we’re going to review the top 5 benefits of using an electric toothbrush.

Sonicare DiamondClean Electric Toothbrush

1. An electronic toothbrush keeps your teeth, gums, and tongue cleaner and healthier

We’ve been taught to brush our teeth thoroughly ever since we were little. Despite our best efforts, though, we’re not brushing as thoroughly as we would like—this is due to the fact that the bristles on manual toothbrushes cannot reach to remove all of the plaque and tartar built up between your teeth.

An electric toothbrush’s rotating head features bristles which can reach further thanks to the combination of motion and equal pressure from the brush itself. Equal pressure is important—far too many manual brushers do a good job on one side of their mouth (a right handed person often brushes the left side of their mouth more thoroughly) but struggle to keep the other side of their mouth as clean. That’s where our second benefit comes in…

2. An electric toothbrush makes for longer, more thorough teeth brushing

Most electronic toothbrushes are set for equal time for each quadrant which ensures a better, longer brushing and a great, clean feeling.

Kids are often one of the biggest beneficiaries of electric toothbrushes. Many kids brush but don’t get all of the food buildup between meals. Kids with braces are especially susceptible to this happening. An electric toothbrush is a good compromise since you can count on it getting all of those hard to reach places that kids miss with manual brushing.

3. An electric toothbrush does the work for you

Old habits die hard. Although we mean well our manual brushing can often be too hard for our gums and our own good. An electric toothbrush not only times your brush (as stated above) but takes the guesswork out of teeth brushing too.

4. An electric toothbrush is a great way to fight gingivitis and gum disease

An electric toothbrush is an excellent tool in the fight against gingivitis and gum disease in your mouth. How? An electric toothbrush can find those hard to reach places that you miss with a manual toothbrush. You’re not just brushing longer and better but you’re brushing smarter, too.

5. Using an electric toothbrush can help you get rid of bad breath

Bad breath is a symptom of food and plaque which have become lodged in the nooks and crannies between your teeth and along your gums. An electric toothbrush and regular flossing can work together to get rid of bad breath by finding and eliminating the food between your teeth.

Contact your Local Denist Orthodontist in San Diego

Oral health effects your overall health

Excerpt from Mayoclinic

Did you know that your oral health can offer clues about your overall health — or that problems in your mouth can affect the rest of your body? Understand the intimate connection between oral health and overall health and what you can do to protect yourself.

What’s the connection between oral health and overall health?

Like many areas of the body, your mouth is teeming with bacteria — most of them harmless. Normally the body’s natural defenses and good oral health care, such as daily brushing and flossing, can keep these bacteria under control. However, without proper oral hygiene, bacteria can reach levels that might lead to oral infections, such as tooth decay and gum disease.

In addition, certain medications — such as decongestants, antihistamines, painkillers and diuretics — can reduce saliva flow. Saliva washes away food and neutralizes acids produced by bacteria in the mouth, helping to protect you from microbial invasion or overgrowth that might lead to disease.

Studies also suggest that oral bacteria and the inflammation associated with periodontitis — a severe form of gum disease — might play a role in some diseases. In addition, certain diseases, such as diabetes and HIV/AIDS, can lower the body’s resistance to infection, making oral health problems more severe.

What conditions may be linked to oral health?

Your oral health might affect, be affected by, or contribute to various diseases and conditions, including:

  • Endocarditis. Endocarditis is an infection of the inner lining of your heart (endocardium). Endocarditis typically occurs when bacteria or other germs from another part of your body, such as your mouth, spread through your bloodstream and attach to damaged areas in your heart.
  • Cardiovascular disease. Some research suggests that heart disease, clogged arteries and stroke might be linked to the inflammation and infections that oral bacteria can cause.
  • Pregnancy and birth. Periodontitis has been linked to premature birth and low birth weight.
  • Diabetes. Diabetes reduces the body’s resistance to infection — putting the gums at risk. Gum disease appears to be more frequent and severe among people who have diabetes. Research shows that people who have gum disease have a harder time controlling their blood sugar levels.
  • HIV/AIDS. Oral problems, such as painful mucosal lesions, are common in people who have HIV/AIDS.
  • Osteoporosis. Osteoporosis — which causes bones to become weak and brittle — might be linked with periodontal bone loss and tooth loss.
  • Alzheimer’s disease. Tooth loss before age 35 might be a risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease.
  • Other conditions. Other conditions that might be linked to oral health include Sjogren’s syndrome — an immune system disorder that causes dry mouth — and eating disorders.

Because of these potential links, be sure to tell your dentist if you’re taking any medications or have had any changes in your overall health — especially if you’ve had any recent illnesses or you have a chronic condition, such as diabetes.

How can I protect my oral health?

To protect your oral health, practice good oral hygiene every day. For example:

  • Brush your teeth at least twice a day.
  • Floss daily.
  • Eat a healthy diet and limit between-meal snacks.
  • Replace your toothbrush every three to four months or sooner if bristles are frayed.
  • Schedule regular dental checkups.

Also, contact your dentist as soon as an oral health problem arises. Remember, taking care of your oral health is an investment in your overall health.

facebook     twitter

Braces FAQ

Want to know if braces are right for you? Here are some FAQ about braces. If you are in the San Diego area and looking for a great orthodontist please give us a visit. https://plus.google.com/114254653842619176847/about
This is a subjective choice, but braces can still be quite effective for adults and modern styles are much less noticeable than the braces that many adults remember. In fact, about 20% of patients with braces are over 18. Many adults decide to get braces because they couldn’t afford them as a kid and now can, or because their teeth have shifted with age. Getting braces, even as an adult, can give you decades of more attractive straight teeth and correct serious structural problems, so many people see them as a worthwhile investment.
Some people may get braces for mostly cosmetic reasons but there are also a number of health benefits to straighter teeth. Straight teeth are easier to clean well, which reduces tooth decay and gingivitis. Correcting the bite also fixes many structural problems, which can reduce jaw pain and make chewing less painful.
No. They may not be exactly enjoyable, but they’re less noticeable, less painful, and more efficient than you remember. You can now get clear brackets or Invisalign for a less noticeable look, and even “traditional” metal brackets are much smaller than in the past. New heat-activated wires move teeth with constant, more gradual pressure, so each adjustment hurts less and teeth realign more quickly. Computer technology in orthodontics has also improved greatly, giving us “smart” wires and brackets that move teeth faster and more efficiently.
Just as children mature at different ages, their teeth and jaws mature at different ages. To be ready for full braces (sometimes known as Phase II treatment), kids generally need to have all of their permanent teeth. Early developers may have all of their permanent teeth (except wisdom teeth) by age 9, while late bloomers may not get them until age 14 or later. On average, girls’ mouths also develop slightly earlier than boys, and they tend to be ready for braces about 6-12 months sooner.
Possibly, but not necessarily. The mixed dentition stage where adult teeth are first starting to come in is known as the “ugly duckling” stage for teeth, so some crookedness can be normal. However, if you notice significant crowding, the chances that your kid will need braces are higher. Only an orthodontist can tell you for sure. Call us for a free consultation today @(619) 550-1111 or visit 24-7emergencydental.com
facebook

What Are Toothaches?

A toothache is pain that you feel in or around your tooth. Most often, toothache pain is a sign that there is something wrong with your tooth or gums. Sometimes, however, toothache pain is referred pain, meaning that the pain is caused by a problem elsewhere in your body.

You should never ignore toothaches. Toothaches caused by tooth decay can get worse if left untreated. Toothaches are usually not life threatening, but in some cases, they can be signs of serious conditions that require immediate medical treatment. If you are in the San Diego are looking for a dentist please call and schedule an appointment immediately with Orthodontic & General Dentistry in San Diego Ca. Call (619) 550-1111 or visit  https://plus.google.com/u/0/b/114254653842619176847/114254653842619176847/about

What Are Toothaches?

A toothache is pain that you feel in or around your tooth. Most often, toothache pain is a sign that there is something wrong with your tooth or gums. Sometimes, however, toothache pain is referred pain, meaning that the pain is caused by a problem elsewhere in your body.

You should never ignore toothaches. Toothaches caused by tooth decay can get worse if left untreated. Toothaches are usually not life threatening, but in some cases, they can be signs of serious conditions that require immediate medical treatment.

What Do Toothaches Feel Like?

Toothache pain can range from mild to severe, and may be constant or intermittent. You may feel:

  • throbbing pain in or around your tooth
  • sharp pain when you touch your tooth or bite down
  • tenderness and achiness in or around your tooth
  • painful sensitivity in your tooth in response to hot or cold foods and drinks
  • burning or shock-like pain (uncommon)

Underlying Causes of Toothaches

Common Causes of Toothaches

Tooth decay is the most common reason for toothaches. If tooth decay goes untreated, an abscess (an infection near your tooth or in the pulp inside your tooth) can develop. See your dentist right away if you think you have a dental abscess. In rare cases, the infection can spread to your brain, which can be life threatening.

A toothache can also be caused by an impacted tooth, which is when a tooth—usually a wisdom tooth—is stuck in your gum tissue or bone and cannot erupt (grow in).

Common Causes of Referred Pain Toothaches

Sinusitis is a condition in which your sinuses become inflamed due to a viral, bacterial, or fungal infection in the sinus cavity. Because the roots of your upper teeth are close to your sinuses, sinusitis can cause pain in your upper teeth.

Less Common Causes of Referred Pain Toothaches

Heart disease and lung cancer can cause toothaches, according to a 2010 entry in the journal General Dentistry (Myers DE, General Dentistry, 2010), and may be a warning sign of a heart attack. The vagus nerve is the reason heart and lung disease can cause toothache pain. This nerve runs from your brain to the different organs in your body, including your heart and lungs, passing through the jaw.

Rare Causes of Referred Pain Toothaches

Trigeminal neuralgia and occipital neuralgia are painful neurological conditions that cause the trigeminal and occipital nerves to become irritated or inflamed. These nerves service your skull, face, and teeth. When they become inflamed, pain can appear to be coming from the teeth.

When a Toothache Is an Emergency

Seek emergency treatment if you have a toothache as well as:

  • swelling in your jaw or face (your tooth infection may be spreading)
  • chest pain, shortness of breath, lightheadedness, or other signs of a heart attack
  • a cough that won’t go away, wheezing, or coughing up blood (may be signs of lung cancer)

Treating Toothaches

Toothaches usually require medical treatment. Home treatment may temporarily relieve your pain while you wait for your dentist or doctor’s appointment.

Dental Treatment

Most people go to a dentist for a toothache, since most toothaches are caused by problems with the teeth. Your dentist will do X-rays and a physical exam of your teeth to detect tooth decay and other dental problems.

Your dentist may give you painkillers and antibiotics to treat an infection, if necessary. If your toothache is due to tooth decay, your dentist will remove the decay with a drill and fill the space with dental materials. An impacted tooth may require surgical removal. If your dentist cannot find the cause of your toothache, he or she may refer you to a doctor for further diagnosis and treatment.

Sinusitis Treatment

Your doctor may treat sinusitis with antibiotics or decongestant medications, and in rare cases with surgery to open your nasal passages.

Treatment for Trigeminal Neuralgia and Occipital Neuralgia

There is no cure for these conditions. Treatment usually consists of relieving your pain with medications.

Treatment for Heart Attack, Heart Disease, and Lung Cancer

If your dentist suspects that you are having a heart attack, he or she will send you to the emergency room. If your dentist suspects that you have heart or lung disease, he will refer you to a doctor for further testing.

Home Treatment

Things that may help temporarily relieve your tooth pain include:

  • over-the-counter pain relievers, such as aspirin
  • clove oil applied to the aching tooth
  • Anbesol, Orajel, or other over-the-counter topical dental pain relievers
  • over-the-counter decongestants, such as Sudafed, if the pain is due to sinus congestion

How to Prevent Toothaches

To help prevent toothaches, brush and floss your teeth at least twice a day and get dental checkups and cleanings twice a year, or as often as recommended by your dentist.

You can help keep your heart and lungs healthy by not smoking, eating a low-fat and high-fiber diet, and exercising at least 30 minutes a day, three times a week. Get your doctor’s permission before starting an exercise routine.

Article Sources:

How To Find The Right Dentist

When you’re searching for a dentist, the American Dental Association (ADA) offers these suggestions:

Ask family, friends, neighbors, or co-workers for their recommendations.
Ask your family doctor or local pharmacist.
If you’re moving, ask your current dentist to make a recommendation.

What Should I Look For When Choosing a Dentist?

You and your dentist will be long-term oral health care partners; therefore, you should find someone you can be comfortable with. To find a suitable dentist to meet your needs, consider asking the following questions as a starting point:

What are the office hours? Are they convenient for your schedule?
Is the office easy to get to from work or home?
Where was the dentist educated and trained?
What’s the dentist’s approach to preventive dentistry?
How often does the dentist attend conferences and continuing education workshops?
What type of anesthesia is the dentist certified to administer to help you relax and feel more comfortable during any necessary dental treatment?
What arrangements are made for handling emergencies outside of office hours? (Most dentists make arrangements with a colleague or emergency referral service if they are unable to tend to emergencies.)
Is information provided about all fees and payment plans before treatment is scheduled? If you are comparison shopping, ask for estimates on some common procedures such as full-mouth X-rays, an oral exam and cleaning, and filling a cavity.
Does the dentist participate in your dental health plan?
What is the dentist’s office policy on missed appointments?

If visiting a dentist’s office:

Does the office appear to be clean, neat, and orderly? Do all surfaces and equipment in the treatment room appear clean?
Is the dental staff helpful and willing to answer your questions?
Do you observe the dentist and staff wearing gloves and other protective gear during actual patient treatment?

Contact us today. http://www.24-7emergencydental.com/