Braces Early On

When your child gets braces, there can be a lot of new things to get used to for both them and you. One of the major lessons to learn is how to take care of the braces. Once the orthodontist actually puts the braces on and your child is back at home, you inherit the role of the oral care expert. Teaching your children how to brush with braces gives them the tools to protect the braces and keep their teeth clean. Here’s how to do it.

The Right Tools

Making sure they have the right utensils in the bathroom encourages your child to do his part in keeping teeth clean. Here are some of the things you’ll need for brushing with braces:

  • A soft-bristled toothbrush, like the Colgate SlimSoft, which has thinner, soft bristles that are perfect for cleaning braces, brackets and the wires, as well as along the gum line and teeth.
  • A fluoride toothpaste. Let your child choose a flavor he loves so he’s more likely to brush.
  • Floss and a floss threader to clean in between the teeth.
  • An oral irrigator to blast out stuck food particles.

By making your kid an active participant in choosing oral care products, you’ll have a more willing subject when it comes time to clean teeth before bedtime.

Brushing Technique

It’s important to teach your child the right way to brush with braces because braces create areas in which food can hide, and that can lead to tooth decay and gum problems. Here are the steps to follow:

  • Remove any elastics fitted to the braces.
  • Using the soft-bristled toothbrush, have your child brush at a 45 degree angle where the gums meet the teeth, using back and forth motion.
  • Gently brush the braces, but use enough pressure to push the bristles onto the brace brackets on the top and bottom surfaces and to clean the wire.
  • Once each tooth has been brushed, rinse and examine the teeth to make sure there are no food particles still stuck in the braces.
  • Reinsert the elastics for the braces.

The brushing process should take about two minutes, or the length of your child’s favorite song. Try loading up a tune on your MP3 player to make sure your braces-wearer is brushing for the right amount of time.

How to Floss

Obviously wiring across each tooth makes flossing between them much more difficult, but it’s still an important part of the process. You can use an oral irrigator to remove food particles, but the NYU College of Dentistry suggests flossing should be done at least once a day. Lend a hand until your child gets the hang of it; the floss will need to be used with a floss threader and your child would place the floss through the floss threader, which looks like the eye of a needle. Gently place it under the wire and between the teeth using a push pull stroke to remove any plaque or food debris between the teeth. Make sure you use a fresh piece of floss between each tooth so your child is not moving plaque from tooth to tooth. It takes alittle time and effort to get used to flossing with braces on. There are also thin interdental (in between the teeth) cleaning brushes that can also be used if using a floss threader is a challenging experience.

Making it Easier

The more attention your kids pay to keeping their braces clean, the easier their oral care routine will be. Teeth can be sore after an adjustment, so soft foods and gentle brushing will feel best. It’s also important to avoid sticky foods that can cling to braces. It’s hard to enforce, but keep your kids away from snacks such as popcorn, taffy and gum.

By showing your child how to brush with braces, you are helping him create good habits for the future and ensuring his teeth will be healthy long after the braces come off.

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Braces & Options

Visible Braces

The choices: Anything fixed on the front of the tooth. This could mean traditional metal wires with stainless-steel brackets, metal wires with clear plastic brackets, or metal wires with tooth-colored ceramic brackets.

The pros: Traditional braces are often suggested to fix more severe alignment problems, such as a turned tooth, because they have a better grip on it. Dr Kasiri, whose office is located in San Diego Ca offers free orthodontic evaluations and can create the best perfect smile plan available to you.

The cons: These braces are completely visible. The brackets can cause discomfort and irritate the inside of the mouth for the first week or so until a patient adjusts. There are also issues with eating certain foods and keeping the teeth and braces clean. Clear brackets can stain. Treatment time for metal braces is typically longer, an average of 20 months, because cases tend to be more severe.

 

The choices: Lingual braces are placed completely behind the teeth. Incognito is one brand, as is Harmony, which uses digital technology to create a customized bracket-and-wire system.

The pros: No one can see you’re wearing braces. Because the brackets and wires are custom-made for each tooth, treatment is faster—on average, six months to a year—and requires fewer appointments. Harmony braces can also correct faulty bites with the addition of bite blocks.

The cons: Adjusting to this system can be a struggle. Much as with traditional metal braces, a patient has to avoid eating crunchy foods like carrots. Lingual braces also can cause a patient to speak with a lisp, at least for the first few weeks.  Constant contact between the brackets and the tongue can sometimes lead to irritation. Applying the braces is extremely technique-sensitive, so orthodontists have to be well trained.

For Questions and inquiry please don’t hesitate to call. (858) 552-0052

 

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Tooth Fillings In San Diego Are Looking Shiny White

e popularity of a lily-white smile spawned a billion-dollar business for Procter & Gamble. For gold, it’s meant only more bad news.

Until a decade ago, about 67 metric tons of the yellow metal, worth $2.7 billion today, were filling, capping and crowning teeth worldwide annually. In the last five years, though, demand has plunged almost 60 percent, according to the World Gold Council, and dentists say it’s because of teeth-whitening.

The trend accelerated a decline in gold’s allure caused by newer dental cements and ceramics, and soaring bullion prices. The precious metal that’s surged in 2016 as investors rediscovered its virtue as a haven is now being shunned by ever-larger numbers of patients from Singapore to Sydney.

“We’re in a fad in dentistry where people have to have ‘triple-A, Dulux-white’ teeth,” said Hugo Sachs, 60, vice-president of the Australian Dental Association, who has been practicing dentistry for 37 years. “I doubt very much gold would come back into fashion.”

Gold demand in dentistry fell by 1 ton, or 5 percent, to 18.9 tons in 2015, the London-based Gold Council estimates.

“Long ago, having a gold tooth at the front was some kind of a status symbol,” said Chew Chong Lin, professor of prosthodontics at the National University of Singapore, who graduated from dental school in 1971. “As time went by, cosmetics took over and, therefore, people began wanting to have crowns with a more tooth-like appearance.”

Used by the Etruscans to make dental bridges as early as 630 BC, gold has been featuring in people’s mouths for millennia. In ancient times, women deliberately removed one or two incisors and replaced them with golden prosthetic ones, according to Marshall Joseph Becker, an emeritus professor of anthropology at the West Chester University of Pennsylvania.

Today’s dental patients prefer materials, such as ceramics, that blend, not clash, with their other teeth. And, thanks to lasers and bleach, pearly whites have seldom been whiter. P&G’s Crest Whitestrips, first sold in 2000, was “the largest product introduction in the history of” the 179-year-old multinational company, according to its lead inventor. Americans will this year spend $420.1 million on over-the-counter products to whiten their teeth, market researcher Euromonitor International predicts.

“We hardly ever use gold in front teeth now, almost never,” said Lindsay Richards, dean of dentistry at the University of Adelaide in South Australia, where he’s taught since 1982. “I would’ve last done a gold filling 10 years ago in a front tooth. For the back teeth, it’s still an excellent material, but people don’t like the look of it.”

As a crown for back teeth, gold is the strongest material and enables more of the existing tooth structure to be preserved, said Sachs, who practices in the rural townships of Harden and Cootamundra in New South Wales state. Unlike porcelain, gold doesn’t fracture.

“But people tend not to want to show gold, or for that matter silver, fillings these days, even though they are a very good tooth restorative,” he said.

Gold alloys that contain smaller amounts of silver, copper, palladium and other materials are especially resistant to plaque and cavities, making them one of the most durable materials for dental work, such as crowns, said R. Balakrishnan, who’s worked as a dentist in Malaysia’s capital city and the surrounding Selangor state for 40 years.

“Gold should make a comeback as far as posterior restorations are concerned,” Balakrishnan said. “When you have these crowns, they last you a lifetime.”

The precious metal is expensive, though. The price climbed every year from 2001 to 2012, reaching $1,921.17 an ounce on the spot market in 2011. It’s advanced 16 percent to $1,233.18 so far this year, according to Bloomberg generic pricing.

That means a patient needing a filling could get half a dozen composite resins for the price of a gold inlay in a front tooth, said Sachs, who last used gold to replace missing front-tooth structure 30 years ago.

A filling with a gold cap might use five to eight grams of the precious metal, Richards said. “You would have hundreds of dollars worth of gold in a gold crown, whereas it used to be tens of dollars,” he said. “That’s made a difference.”

Gold in dentistry accounts for less than 1 percent of global demand. More than half is fashioned into jewelry, while a fifth is kept as bars or coins as an investment, according to gold council data.

These days, gold teeth are more likely to be seen in the mouths of the older generation or of headline-grabbing celebrities, such as British deejay Goldie and Pogues singer Shane MacGowan. American rapper Nelly captured the appeal of bejeweled cosmetic dental apparatuses in his song “Grillz,” released more than a decade ago.

Those at least set them apart from teeth-whitening devotees.

“It’s horses for courses,” the Australian Dental Association’s Sachs said. “But everybody is walking around with the same colored smile — it loses a bit of character as far as I am concerned. For your free consultation Contact Us

Oral health effects your overall health

Excerpt from Mayoclinic

Did you know that your oral health can offer clues about your overall health — or that problems in your mouth can affect the rest of your body? Understand the intimate connection between oral health and overall health and what you can do to protect yourself.

What’s the connection between oral health and overall health?

Like many areas of the body, your mouth is teeming with bacteria — most of them harmless. Normally the body’s natural defenses and good oral health care, such as daily brushing and flossing, can keep these bacteria under control. However, without proper oral hygiene, bacteria can reach levels that might lead to oral infections, such as tooth decay and gum disease.

In addition, certain medications — such as decongestants, antihistamines, painkillers and diuretics — can reduce saliva flow. Saliva washes away food and neutralizes acids produced by bacteria in the mouth, helping to protect you from microbial invasion or overgrowth that might lead to disease.

Studies also suggest that oral bacteria and the inflammation associated with periodontitis — a severe form of gum disease — might play a role in some diseases. In addition, certain diseases, such as diabetes and HIV/AIDS, can lower the body’s resistance to infection, making oral health problems more severe.

What conditions may be linked to oral health?

Your oral health might affect, be affected by, or contribute to various diseases and conditions, including:

  • Endocarditis. Endocarditis is an infection of the inner lining of your heart (endocardium). Endocarditis typically occurs when bacteria or other germs from another part of your body, such as your mouth, spread through your bloodstream and attach to damaged areas in your heart.
  • Cardiovascular disease. Some research suggests that heart disease, clogged arteries and stroke might be linked to the inflammation and infections that oral bacteria can cause.
  • Pregnancy and birth. Periodontitis has been linked to premature birth and low birth weight.
  • Diabetes. Diabetes reduces the body’s resistance to infection — putting the gums at risk. Gum disease appears to be more frequent and severe among people who have diabetes. Research shows that people who have gum disease have a harder time controlling their blood sugar levels.
  • HIV/AIDS. Oral problems, such as painful mucosal lesions, are common in people who have HIV/AIDS.
  • Osteoporosis. Osteoporosis — which causes bones to become weak and brittle — might be linked with periodontal bone loss and tooth loss.
  • Alzheimer’s disease. Tooth loss before age 35 might be a risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease.
  • Other conditions. Other conditions that might be linked to oral health include Sjogren’s syndrome — an immune system disorder that causes dry mouth — and eating disorders.

Because of these potential links, be sure to tell your dentist if you’re taking any medications or have had any changes in your overall health — especially if you’ve had any recent illnesses or you have a chronic condition, such as diabetes.

How can I protect my oral health?

To protect your oral health, practice good oral hygiene every day. For example:

  • Brush your teeth at least twice a day.
  • Floss daily.
  • Eat a healthy diet and limit between-meal snacks.
  • Replace your toothbrush every three to four months or sooner if bristles are frayed.
  • Schedule regular dental checkups.

Also, contact your dentist as soon as an oral health problem arises. Remember, taking care of your oral health is an investment in your overall health.

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Braces FAQ

Want to know if braces are right for you? Here are some FAQ about braces. If you are in the San Diego area and looking for a great orthodontist please give us a visit. https://plus.google.com/114254653842619176847/about
This is a subjective choice, but braces can still be quite effective for adults and modern styles are much less noticeable than the braces that many adults remember. In fact, about 20% of patients with braces are over 18. Many adults decide to get braces because they couldn’t afford them as a kid and now can, or because their teeth have shifted with age. Getting braces, even as an adult, can give you decades of more attractive straight teeth and correct serious structural problems, so many people see them as a worthwhile investment.
Some people may get braces for mostly cosmetic reasons but there are also a number of health benefits to straighter teeth. Straight teeth are easier to clean well, which reduces tooth decay and gingivitis. Correcting the bite also fixes many structural problems, which can reduce jaw pain and make chewing less painful.
No. They may not be exactly enjoyable, but they’re less noticeable, less painful, and more efficient than you remember. You can now get clear brackets or Invisalign for a less noticeable look, and even “traditional” metal brackets are much smaller than in the past. New heat-activated wires move teeth with constant, more gradual pressure, so each adjustment hurts less and teeth realign more quickly. Computer technology in orthodontics has also improved greatly, giving us “smart” wires and brackets that move teeth faster and more efficiently.
Just as children mature at different ages, their teeth and jaws mature at different ages. To be ready for full braces (sometimes known as Phase II treatment), kids generally need to have all of their permanent teeth. Early developers may have all of their permanent teeth (except wisdom teeth) by age 9, while late bloomers may not get them until age 14 or later. On average, girls’ mouths also develop slightly earlier than boys, and they tend to be ready for braces about 6-12 months sooner.
Possibly, but not necessarily. The mixed dentition stage where adult teeth are first starting to come in is known as the “ugly duckling” stage for teeth, so some crookedness can be normal. However, if you notice significant crowding, the chances that your kid will need braces are higher. Only an orthodontist can tell you for sure. Call us for a free consultation today @(619) 550-1111 or visit 24-7emergencydental.com
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What Are Toothaches?

A toothache is pain that you feel in or around your tooth. Most often, toothache pain is a sign that there is something wrong with your tooth or gums. Sometimes, however, toothache pain is referred pain, meaning that the pain is caused by a problem elsewhere in your body.

You should never ignore toothaches. Toothaches caused by tooth decay can get worse if left untreated. Toothaches are usually not life threatening, but in some cases, they can be signs of serious conditions that require immediate medical treatment. If you are in the San Diego are looking for a dentist please call and schedule an appointment immediately with Orthodontic & General Dentistry in San Diego Ca. Call (619) 550-1111 or visit  https://plus.google.com/u/0/b/114254653842619176847/114254653842619176847/about

What Are Toothaches?

A toothache is pain that you feel in or around your tooth. Most often, toothache pain is a sign that there is something wrong with your tooth or gums. Sometimes, however, toothache pain is referred pain, meaning that the pain is caused by a problem elsewhere in your body.

You should never ignore toothaches. Toothaches caused by tooth decay can get worse if left untreated. Toothaches are usually not life threatening, but in some cases, they can be signs of serious conditions that require immediate medical treatment.

What Do Toothaches Feel Like?

Toothache pain can range from mild to severe, and may be constant or intermittent. You may feel:

  • throbbing pain in or around your tooth
  • sharp pain when you touch your tooth or bite down
  • tenderness and achiness in or around your tooth
  • painful sensitivity in your tooth in response to hot or cold foods and drinks
  • burning or shock-like pain (uncommon)

Underlying Causes of Toothaches

Common Causes of Toothaches

Tooth decay is the most common reason for toothaches. If tooth decay goes untreated, an abscess (an infection near your tooth or in the pulp inside your tooth) can develop. See your dentist right away if you think you have a dental abscess. In rare cases, the infection can spread to your brain, which can be life threatening.

A toothache can also be caused by an impacted tooth, which is when a tooth—usually a wisdom tooth—is stuck in your gum tissue or bone and cannot erupt (grow in).

Common Causes of Referred Pain Toothaches

Sinusitis is a condition in which your sinuses become inflamed due to a viral, bacterial, or fungal infection in the sinus cavity. Because the roots of your upper teeth are close to your sinuses, sinusitis can cause pain in your upper teeth.

Less Common Causes of Referred Pain Toothaches

Heart disease and lung cancer can cause toothaches, according to a 2010 entry in the journal General Dentistry (Myers DE, General Dentistry, 2010), and may be a warning sign of a heart attack. The vagus nerve is the reason heart and lung disease can cause toothache pain. This nerve runs from your brain to the different organs in your body, including your heart and lungs, passing through the jaw.

Rare Causes of Referred Pain Toothaches

Trigeminal neuralgia and occipital neuralgia are painful neurological conditions that cause the trigeminal and occipital nerves to become irritated or inflamed. These nerves service your skull, face, and teeth. When they become inflamed, pain can appear to be coming from the teeth.

When a Toothache Is an Emergency

Seek emergency treatment if you have a toothache as well as:

  • swelling in your jaw or face (your tooth infection may be spreading)
  • chest pain, shortness of breath, lightheadedness, or other signs of a heart attack
  • a cough that won’t go away, wheezing, or coughing up blood (may be signs of lung cancer)

Treating Toothaches

Toothaches usually require medical treatment. Home treatment may temporarily relieve your pain while you wait for your dentist or doctor’s appointment.

Dental Treatment

Most people go to a dentist for a toothache, since most toothaches are caused by problems with the teeth. Your dentist will do X-rays and a physical exam of your teeth to detect tooth decay and other dental problems.

Your dentist may give you painkillers and antibiotics to treat an infection, if necessary. If your toothache is due to tooth decay, your dentist will remove the decay with a drill and fill the space with dental materials. An impacted tooth may require surgical removal. If your dentist cannot find the cause of your toothache, he or she may refer you to a doctor for further diagnosis and treatment.

Sinusitis Treatment

Your doctor may treat sinusitis with antibiotics or decongestant medications, and in rare cases with surgery to open your nasal passages.

Treatment for Trigeminal Neuralgia and Occipital Neuralgia

There is no cure for these conditions. Treatment usually consists of relieving your pain with medications.

Treatment for Heart Attack, Heart Disease, and Lung Cancer

If your dentist suspects that you are having a heart attack, he or she will send you to the emergency room. If your dentist suspects that you have heart or lung disease, he will refer you to a doctor for further testing.

Home Treatment

Things that may help temporarily relieve your tooth pain include:

  • over-the-counter pain relievers, such as aspirin
  • clove oil applied to the aching tooth
  • Anbesol, Orajel, or other over-the-counter topical dental pain relievers
  • over-the-counter decongestants, such as Sudafed, if the pain is due to sinus congestion

How to Prevent Toothaches

To help prevent toothaches, brush and floss your teeth at least twice a day and get dental checkups and cleanings twice a year, or as often as recommended by your dentist.

You can help keep your heart and lungs healthy by not smoking, eating a low-fat and high-fiber diet, and exercising at least 30 minutes a day, three times a week. Get your doctor’s permission before starting an exercise routine.

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How To Find The Right Dentist

When you’re searching for a dentist, the American Dental Association (ADA) offers these suggestions:

Ask family, friends, neighbors, or co-workers for their recommendations.
Ask your family doctor or local pharmacist.
If you’re moving, ask your current dentist to make a recommendation.

What Should I Look For When Choosing a Dentist?

You and your dentist will be long-term oral health care partners; therefore, you should find someone you can be comfortable with. To find a suitable dentist to meet your needs, consider asking the following questions as a starting point:

What are the office hours? Are they convenient for your schedule?
Is the office easy to get to from work or home?
Where was the dentist educated and trained?
What’s the dentist’s approach to preventive dentistry?
How often does the dentist attend conferences and continuing education workshops?
What type of anesthesia is the dentist certified to administer to help you relax and feel more comfortable during any necessary dental treatment?
What arrangements are made for handling emergencies outside of office hours? (Most dentists make arrangements with a colleague or emergency referral service if they are unable to tend to emergencies.)
Is information provided about all fees and payment plans before treatment is scheduled? If you are comparison shopping, ask for estimates on some common procedures such as full-mouth X-rays, an oral exam and cleaning, and filling a cavity.
Does the dentist participate in your dental health plan?
What is the dentist’s office policy on missed appointments?

If visiting a dentist’s office:

Does the office appear to be clean, neat, and orderly? Do all surfaces and equipment in the treatment room appear clean?
Is the dental staff helpful and willing to answer your questions?
Do you observe the dentist and staff wearing gloves and other protective gear during actual patient treatment?

Contact us today. http://www.24-7emergencydental.com/