Think You’re Too Old For Orthodontics? Think Again!

Do you think orthodontics are only for children or teens? Think again! Now, more than ever, adults are looking for orthodontic treatment for a variety of reasons. Some people want to improve their smiles or correct their bites, other people are seeking to improve their health or to boost their self-esteem. Today, well over a million Americans over the age of 18 wear braces, per the Academy of General Dentistry.

Every day adults are getting braces, even celebrities. Country music singer Faith Hill wore braces to the Grammy Awards in 2013, when she was 45 years old. And when he was 40 years old, Tom Cruise wore ceramic brackets to improve his teeth. In our suburban offices, about 25 percent of our patients are adults. But in our downtown San Diego office,  a lot of  of our patients are adults, which means you won’t have to worry about being the only adult in our office getting work done on your teeth. Our San Diego orthodontic office has 30 years’experience in the smile industry.

  1. Adults should get orthodontics because every smile is important.

Your smile is one of the first things people notice. When you smile, you can have a positive impact on the people around you. But if you’re afraid to smile or you try to cover your teeth when you grin, you won’t have the same effect. Maybe you’ve always had crooked teeth, but you could get orthodontics when you were younger. Or maybe they’ve just recently started to get crooked. Maybe you have serious jaw pain or are having trouble cleaning your teeth properly.

Many people say their crooked or unattractive teeth are holding them back from living life to the fullest. Your oral health can impact your ability to get a job and can have a direct impact on your social life. Why not explore orthodontics and fix your mouth now? The results will amaze you, and you’ll no longer feel self-conscious about your teeth in the future.

  1. Adults should consider orthodontics because teeth can move at any age, even if they are healthy.

Teeth can shift at any age. Maybe due to an injury, a health condition, or simply natural growth. Perhaps you had straight teeth in the past, but are now facing a crooked and overcrowded smile. Even if you had braces in the past, you may need them again. Why? Some people have mouths that change naturally. Other people neglect to wear their retainers as much as they should. Orthodontists now tell people to wear retainers much longer than they recommended in previous decades. Some people even need to wear one for life.

  1. Adults should get orthodontics because today, orthodontic options are better, cheaper, and less noticeable.

Braces have changed over the years. Today, wearing braces is less painful and requires less time. Almost all our adult braces patients are happy they made the commitment to correct their teeth. No longer do you need to suffer the embarrassment of being a metal mouth. The brackets used today are smaller and bands that wrap around the tooth are no longer used. Ceramic braces are popular with adults due to their cosmetic appeal because they are made of a translucent (clear) material.

Maybe your parents couldn’t afford braces when you were growing up, but now you can. Many medical and dental insurance plans cover part of the cost. Or maybe you make enough money to save and pay for orthodontics out of pocket. Our orthodontic office in San Diego offers many financing options to accommodate your needs, and we would be happy to go over these with you. We can also review your insurance policy and help you maximize your benefit and file your claims.

  1. Adults should get orthodontics to avoid serious problems with their teeth and mouth.

Study has shown that the frequency of misalignment in adults is comparable to the frequency in children and teens. When you have a cross bite or misaligned teeth, you have an increased chance of plaque and food buildup between your teeth. This means you may get periodontal disease or gum disease. You can also possibly avoid tooth decay, gum and bone loss, irregular wear of the tooth enamel, and TMJ/TMD pain (or chronic facial discomfort). Also, if you’re thinking about getting dental implants, the rest of your teeth will need to be straight first, so you’ll want to get orthodontics before you can consider that treatment option.

  1. Adults should consider orthodontics because people are living longer.

People are living longer, and many people are keeping their teeth for life, so it makes sense to pay the price to straighten crooked or crowded teeth. Even older adults are getting braces. Per the American Association of Orthodontists, more and more people who are in their 60s, 70s, and 80s are using braces.

Are you ready to smile a lot more? What’s holding you back from getting braces as an adult? If you have trouble biting, chewing, or speaking, or you have teeth that are crowded or protruding, why haven’t you decided to explore orthodontics yet? Are you worried about the pain? Improvements in technology make the process of getting braces much more gentle and pain is no longer a question. Adults often do a better job caring for their orthodontic appliances and following the instruction of their orthodontist, which means their results can be more impressive than those of a child or teen.

Tooth, teeth, oral pain. What is it?

Symptom: Sensitivity to hot or cold foods and liquids.

 

Possible problem: If discomfort lasts only moments, sensitivity generally does not signal a serious problem. It may be caused by; a small area of decay in a tooth, a loose filling or an exposed root surface resulting from gum recession and possibly toothbrush abrasion.

What to do: If a root surface is sensitive, keep it clean and free of dental bacterial plaque. Use a soft toothbrush, cleaning very gently at the gum line, and brush no more than twice daily. Try using fluoride-containing toothpaste made for sensitive teeth. You can even try using toothpaste like an ointment, rubbing it into the root surface for ten minutes or so at a time. If the sensitivity continues, see your dentist.

Symptom: Sensitivity to hot or cold foods after dental treatment.

 

Possible problem: Dental work may result in tooth sensitivity due to inflammation of the pulp tissues inside a tooth.

What to do: This sensitivity should last no longer then a few days; however, if decay has recently been removed or a filling or crown recently has been placed, a tooth may take a week or two to settle. Mild pain relievers like acetaminophen, aspirin or ibuprofen should help. If the pain persists or worsens, see your dentist.

Symptom: Sharp pain when biting down on food.

 

Possible problem: Decay, a loose filling and/or a cracked tooth are possible causes.

What to do: See a dentist to diagnose the problem before the pain worsens. Decay will need to be removed, and a loose filling replaced by your dentist. If the pain is caused by pulp tissue damage, your dentist may send you to an endodontist (“endo” – inside; “dont” – tooth), a specialist who will perform a root canal treatment to clean out the damaged pulp, disinfect the root canal and fill and seal the remaining space to save the tooth. A cracked tooth may be difficult to treat not only if it involves the pulp, but also depending on the location and depth of the crack. (See the Dear Doctormagazine article on “Cracked Tooth Syndrome”)

Symptom: Lingering pain after eating hot or cold foods and liquids.

 

Possible problem: This probably means the pulp is inflamed and/or dying, and may be irreversibly damaged usually as a result of deep decay or physical trauma.

What to do: See your dentist or endodontist to diagnose the problem before the pain becomes severe due to the development of an abscess. The tooth will likely need root canal treatment to remove the dying or dead pulp tissue to save the tooth.

Floor of the sinus

Symptom: Dull ache and pressure in the upper teeth and sinus area of one or both sides.

 

Possible problem: Pain felt in the sinus area of the face is often associated with the upper back teeth because they share the same nerves. The origin of this “referred” pain consequently may be difficult to determine. Therefore, sinus pain can feel like tooth pain and vice versa. That’s why sinus congestion from a cold or flu can cause pain in the upper teeth. Additionally it’s also important to determine if clenching or grinding is a factor, as they too cause similar symptoms.

What to do: See your dentist or endodontist to find out if the symptoms are dentally related; otherwise, you may need to see your family physician. However, don’t wait until the pain worsens.

Schedule An Emergency Appointment: http://www.24-7emergencydental.com/

858.552.0052

 

 

 

Holiday Dental Care Tips

  1. Avoid Desserts and SweetsOkay well maybe don’t avoid the sweets. The party may offer a multitude of sugary snacks and holiday desserts, but don’t forget that drinks like eggnog, hot cocoa, punch and most liqueurs contain a high level of sugars. Take a quick trip to the restroom and brush. By limiting your consumption, you can deter unwanted tooth decay while reducing any harmful effects to your waistline.
  2. Try Not to StressIf the season is stressing you out, you may find yourself grinding or clinching your teeth during stressful situations and often while you sleep. This can cause headaches and jaw pain, as well as damaged teeth and dental work. The best way to address this problem is to use a dental mouth guard, which won’t stop the grinding but can prevent it from causing pain.
  3. Don’t Forget Your ToothbrushHoliday parties with friends and family are about gathering together where lots of food and beverages are on hand. By bringing a toothbrush, toothpaste and dental floss, you can periodically excuse yourself to take care of your teeth. If you cannot do this, at least try to rinse your mouth with water between dinner courses or chew sugar-less gums.
  4. Have an Emergency Dental ContactThe wrong bite into a candy cane can result in a dental disaster. You may chip a tooth, lose a filling, or break a crown while on vacation or when the dentist’s office is closed. Contact Dr. Kasari’s office to see if they can provide you with emergency dental care over the holiday season.
  5. Take Care of Your TeethThe holiday fun can keep you distracted, but as long as your oral health care becomes a habit, you can continue the holiday fun without fretting about your teeth. Make a resolution to brush and floss regularly and schedule routine check ups with your dentist.

If you are in the San Diego area this season for the holidays we are here for all you’re emergency dental needs.

 

Braces & Options

Visible Braces

The choices: Anything fixed on the front of the tooth. This could mean traditional metal wires with stainless-steel brackets, metal wires with clear plastic brackets, or metal wires with tooth-colored ceramic brackets.

The pros: Traditional braces are often suggested to fix more severe alignment problems, such as a turned tooth, because they have a better grip on it. Dr Kasiri, whose office is located in San Diego Ca offers free orthodontic evaluations and can create the best perfect smile plan available to you.

The cons: These braces are completely visible. The brackets can cause discomfort and irritate the inside of the mouth for the first week or so until a patient adjusts. There are also issues with eating certain foods and keeping the teeth and braces clean. Clear brackets can stain. Treatment time for metal braces is typically longer, an average of 20 months, because cases tend to be more severe.

 

The choices: Lingual braces are placed completely behind the teeth. Incognito is one brand, as is Harmony, which uses digital technology to create a customized bracket-and-wire system.

The pros: No one can see you’re wearing braces. Because the brackets and wires are custom-made for each tooth, treatment is faster—on average, six months to a year—and requires fewer appointments. Harmony braces can also correct faulty bites with the addition of bite blocks.

The cons: Adjusting to this system can be a struggle. Much as with traditional metal braces, a patient has to avoid eating crunchy foods like carrots. Lingual braces also can cause a patient to speak with a lisp, at least for the first few weeks.  Constant contact between the brackets and the tongue can sometimes lead to irritation. Applying the braces is extremely technique-sensitive, so orthodontists have to be well trained.

For Questions and inquiry please don’t hesitate to call. (858) 552-0052

 

Original Story:

Oral health effects your overall health

Excerpt from Mayoclinic

Did you know that your oral health can offer clues about your overall health — or that problems in your mouth can affect the rest of your body? Understand the intimate connection between oral health and overall health and what you can do to protect yourself.

What’s the connection between oral health and overall health?

Like many areas of the body, your mouth is teeming with bacteria — most of them harmless. Normally the body’s natural defenses and good oral health care, such as daily brushing and flossing, can keep these bacteria under control. However, without proper oral hygiene, bacteria can reach levels that might lead to oral infections, such as tooth decay and gum disease.

In addition, certain medications — such as decongestants, antihistamines, painkillers and diuretics — can reduce saliva flow. Saliva washes away food and neutralizes acids produced by bacteria in the mouth, helping to protect you from microbial invasion or overgrowth that might lead to disease.

Studies also suggest that oral bacteria and the inflammation associated with periodontitis — a severe form of gum disease — might play a role in some diseases. In addition, certain diseases, such as diabetes and HIV/AIDS, can lower the body’s resistance to infection, making oral health problems more severe.

What conditions may be linked to oral health?

Your oral health might affect, be affected by, or contribute to various diseases and conditions, including:

  • Endocarditis. Endocarditis is an infection of the inner lining of your heart (endocardium). Endocarditis typically occurs when bacteria or other germs from another part of your body, such as your mouth, spread through your bloodstream and attach to damaged areas in your heart.
  • Cardiovascular disease. Some research suggests that heart disease, clogged arteries and stroke might be linked to the inflammation and infections that oral bacteria can cause.
  • Pregnancy and birth. Periodontitis has been linked to premature birth and low birth weight.
  • Diabetes. Diabetes reduces the body’s resistance to infection — putting the gums at risk. Gum disease appears to be more frequent and severe among people who have diabetes. Research shows that people who have gum disease have a harder time controlling their blood sugar levels.
  • HIV/AIDS. Oral problems, such as painful mucosal lesions, are common in people who have HIV/AIDS.
  • Osteoporosis. Osteoporosis — which causes bones to become weak and brittle — might be linked with periodontal bone loss and tooth loss.
  • Alzheimer’s disease. Tooth loss before age 35 might be a risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease.
  • Other conditions. Other conditions that might be linked to oral health include Sjogren’s syndrome — an immune system disorder that causes dry mouth — and eating disorders.

Because of these potential links, be sure to tell your dentist if you’re taking any medications or have had any changes in your overall health — especially if you’ve had any recent illnesses or you have a chronic condition, such as diabetes.

How can I protect my oral health?

To protect your oral health, practice good oral hygiene every day. For example:

  • Brush your teeth at least twice a day.
  • Floss daily.
  • Eat a healthy diet and limit between-meal snacks.
  • Replace your toothbrush every three to four months or sooner if bristles are frayed.
  • Schedule regular dental checkups.

Also, contact your dentist as soon as an oral health problem arises. Remember, taking care of your oral health is an investment in your overall health.

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Braces FAQ

Want to know if braces are right for you? Here are some FAQ about braces. If you are in the San Diego area and looking for a great orthodontist please give us a visit. https://plus.google.com/114254653842619176847/about
This is a subjective choice, but braces can still be quite effective for adults and modern styles are much less noticeable than the braces that many adults remember. In fact, about 20% of patients with braces are over 18. Many adults decide to get braces because they couldn’t afford them as a kid and now can, or because their teeth have shifted with age. Getting braces, even as an adult, can give you decades of more attractive straight teeth and correct serious structural problems, so many people see them as a worthwhile investment.
Some people may get braces for mostly cosmetic reasons but there are also a number of health benefits to straighter teeth. Straight teeth are easier to clean well, which reduces tooth decay and gingivitis. Correcting the bite also fixes many structural problems, which can reduce jaw pain and make chewing less painful.
No. They may not be exactly enjoyable, but they’re less noticeable, less painful, and more efficient than you remember. You can now get clear brackets or Invisalign for a less noticeable look, and even “traditional” metal brackets are much smaller than in the past. New heat-activated wires move teeth with constant, more gradual pressure, so each adjustment hurts less and teeth realign more quickly. Computer technology in orthodontics has also improved greatly, giving us “smart” wires and brackets that move teeth faster and more efficiently.
Just as children mature at different ages, their teeth and jaws mature at different ages. To be ready for full braces (sometimes known as Phase II treatment), kids generally need to have all of their permanent teeth. Early developers may have all of their permanent teeth (except wisdom teeth) by age 9, while late bloomers may not get them until age 14 or later. On average, girls’ mouths also develop slightly earlier than boys, and they tend to be ready for braces about 6-12 months sooner.
Possibly, but not necessarily. The mixed dentition stage where adult teeth are first starting to come in is known as the “ugly duckling” stage for teeth, so some crookedness can be normal. However, if you notice significant crowding, the chances that your kid will need braces are higher. Only an orthodontist can tell you for sure. Call us for a free consultation today @(619) 550-1111 or visit 24-7emergencydental.com
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How To Find The Right Dentist

When you’re searching for a dentist, the American Dental Association (ADA) offers these suggestions:

Ask family, friends, neighbors, or co-workers for their recommendations.
Ask your family doctor or local pharmacist.
If you’re moving, ask your current dentist to make a recommendation.

What Should I Look For When Choosing a Dentist?

You and your dentist will be long-term oral health care partners; therefore, you should find someone you can be comfortable with. To find a suitable dentist to meet your needs, consider asking the following questions as a starting point:

What are the office hours? Are they convenient for your schedule?
Is the office easy to get to from work or home?
Where was the dentist educated and trained?
What’s the dentist’s approach to preventive dentistry?
How often does the dentist attend conferences and continuing education workshops?
What type of anesthesia is the dentist certified to administer to help you relax and feel more comfortable during any necessary dental treatment?
What arrangements are made for handling emergencies outside of office hours? (Most dentists make arrangements with a colleague or emergency referral service if they are unable to tend to emergencies.)
Is information provided about all fees and payment plans before treatment is scheduled? If you are comparison shopping, ask for estimates on some common procedures such as full-mouth X-rays, an oral exam and cleaning, and filling a cavity.
Does the dentist participate in your dental health plan?
What is the dentist’s office policy on missed appointments?

If visiting a dentist’s office:

Does the office appear to be clean, neat, and orderly? Do all surfaces and equipment in the treatment room appear clean?
Is the dental staff helpful and willing to answer your questions?
Do you observe the dentist and staff wearing gloves and other protective gear during actual patient treatment?

Contact us today. http://www.24-7emergencydental.com/