Tooth, teeth, oral pain. What is it?

Symptom: Sensitivity to hot or cold foods and liquids.

 

Possible problem: If discomfort lasts only moments, sensitivity generally does not signal a serious problem. It may be caused by; a small area of decay in a tooth, a loose filling or an exposed root surface resulting from gum recession and possibly toothbrush abrasion.

What to do: If a root surface is sensitive, keep it clean and free of dental bacterial plaque. Use a soft toothbrush, cleaning very gently at the gum line, and brush no more than twice daily. Try using fluoride-containing toothpaste made for sensitive teeth. You can even try using toothpaste like an ointment, rubbing it into the root surface for ten minutes or so at a time. If the sensitivity continues, see your dentist.

Symptom: Sensitivity to hot or cold foods after dental treatment.

 

Possible problem: Dental work may result in tooth sensitivity due to inflammation of the pulp tissues inside a tooth.

What to do: This sensitivity should last no longer then a few days; however, if decay has recently been removed or a filling or crown recently has been placed, a tooth may take a week or two to settle. Mild pain relievers like acetaminophen, aspirin or ibuprofen should help. If the pain persists or worsens, see your dentist.

Symptom: Sharp pain when biting down on food.

 

Possible problem: Decay, a loose filling and/or a cracked tooth are possible causes.

What to do: See a dentist to diagnose the problem before the pain worsens. Decay will need to be removed, and a loose filling replaced by your dentist. If the pain is caused by pulp tissue damage, your dentist may send you to an endodontist (“endo” – inside; “dont” – tooth), a specialist who will perform a root canal treatment to clean out the damaged pulp, disinfect the root canal and fill and seal the remaining space to save the tooth. A cracked tooth may be difficult to treat not only if it involves the pulp, but also depending on the location and depth of the crack. (See the Dear Doctormagazine article on “Cracked Tooth Syndrome”)

Symptom: Lingering pain after eating hot or cold foods and liquids.

 

Possible problem: This probably means the pulp is inflamed and/or dying, and may be irreversibly damaged usually as a result of deep decay or physical trauma.

What to do: See your dentist or endodontist to diagnose the problem before the pain becomes severe due to the development of an abscess. The tooth will likely need root canal treatment to remove the dying or dead pulp tissue to save the tooth.

Floor of the sinus

Symptom: Dull ache and pressure in the upper teeth and sinus area of one or both sides.

 

Possible problem: Pain felt in the sinus area of the face is often associated with the upper back teeth because they share the same nerves. The origin of this “referred” pain consequently may be difficult to determine. Therefore, sinus pain can feel like tooth pain and vice versa. That’s why sinus congestion from a cold or flu can cause pain in the upper teeth. Additionally it’s also important to determine if clenching or grinding is a factor, as they too cause similar symptoms.

What to do: See your dentist or endodontist to find out if the symptoms are dentally related; otherwise, you may need to see your family physician. However, don’t wait until the pain worsens.

Schedule An Emergency Appointment: http://www.24-7emergencydental.com/

858.552.0052

 

 

 

Holiday Dental Care Tips

  1. Avoid Desserts and SweetsOkay well maybe don’t avoid the sweets. The party may offer a multitude of sugary snacks and holiday desserts, but don’t forget that drinks like eggnog, hot cocoa, punch and most liqueurs contain a high level of sugars. Take a quick trip to the restroom and brush. By limiting your consumption, you can deter unwanted tooth decay while reducing any harmful effects to your waistline.
  2. Try Not to StressIf the season is stressing you out, you may find yourself grinding or clinching your teeth during stressful situations and often while you sleep. This can cause headaches and jaw pain, as well as damaged teeth and dental work. The best way to address this problem is to use a dental mouth guard, which won’t stop the grinding but can prevent it from causing pain.
  3. Don’t Forget Your ToothbrushHoliday parties with friends and family are about gathering together where lots of food and beverages are on hand. By bringing a toothbrush, toothpaste and dental floss, you can periodically excuse yourself to take care of your teeth. If you cannot do this, at least try to rinse your mouth with water between dinner courses or chew sugar-less gums.
  4. Have an Emergency Dental ContactThe wrong bite into a candy cane can result in a dental disaster. You may chip a tooth, lose a filling, or break a crown while on vacation or when the dentist’s office is closed. Contact Dr. Kasari’s office to see if they can provide you with emergency dental care over the holiday season.
  5. Take Care of Your TeethThe holiday fun can keep you distracted, but as long as your oral health care becomes a habit, you can continue the holiday fun without fretting about your teeth. Make a resolution to brush and floss regularly and schedule routine check ups with your dentist.

If you are in the San Diego area this season for the holidays we are here for all you’re emergency dental needs.

 

Emergency Dentist in San Diego, CA

Serving All of San Diego County & Anyone Looking For The Best Dentist Around!

If you have a toothache in the San Diego area, our emergency dentists at Reza Kasiri Dentistry  can provide urgent care for nearly any dental emergency. We accept most dental insurance, offer emergency appointments 24 Hours a day, seven days a week. We also provide flexible payment options for those without dental insurance.(Financing avaliable) Reza Kasiri Dentistry of San Diego is committed to getting you the dental care you deserve quickly, and at a price you can afford.

We are conveniently have two dental locations in San Diego to serve you. Visit 2138 Garnet Ave San Diego, CA 92109 or 3959 30th St #104 San Diego, CA 92104.  Our San Diego offices are here for all of your emergency dental needs. Whether your just visiting the San Diego area or are a resident we’ve got you covered.

At Reza Kasiri Dentistry  San DiegoUSA you can expect:

  • Best services avaliable today
  • Convenient appointments
  • Same day treatment whenever possible
  • Affordable exam fees and treatment costs
  • Payment options for nearly everyone
  • Full disclosure of total costs and out-of-pocket expenses before any treatment begins
  • 24 Hour Emergency Services

Oral health effects your overall health

Excerpt from Mayoclinic

Did you know that your oral health can offer clues about your overall health — or that problems in your mouth can affect the rest of your body? Understand the intimate connection between oral health and overall health and what you can do to protect yourself.

What’s the connection between oral health and overall health?

Like many areas of the body, your mouth is teeming with bacteria — most of them harmless. Normally the body’s natural defenses and good oral health care, such as daily brushing and flossing, can keep these bacteria under control. However, without proper oral hygiene, bacteria can reach levels that might lead to oral infections, such as tooth decay and gum disease.

In addition, certain medications — such as decongestants, antihistamines, painkillers and diuretics — can reduce saliva flow. Saliva washes away food and neutralizes acids produced by bacteria in the mouth, helping to protect you from microbial invasion or overgrowth that might lead to disease.

Studies also suggest that oral bacteria and the inflammation associated with periodontitis — a severe form of gum disease — might play a role in some diseases. In addition, certain diseases, such as diabetes and HIV/AIDS, can lower the body’s resistance to infection, making oral health problems more severe.

What conditions may be linked to oral health?

Your oral health might affect, be affected by, or contribute to various diseases and conditions, including:

  • Endocarditis. Endocarditis is an infection of the inner lining of your heart (endocardium). Endocarditis typically occurs when bacteria or other germs from another part of your body, such as your mouth, spread through your bloodstream and attach to damaged areas in your heart.
  • Cardiovascular disease. Some research suggests that heart disease, clogged arteries and stroke might be linked to the inflammation and infections that oral bacteria can cause.
  • Pregnancy and birth. Periodontitis has been linked to premature birth and low birth weight.
  • Diabetes. Diabetes reduces the body’s resistance to infection — putting the gums at risk. Gum disease appears to be more frequent and severe among people who have diabetes. Research shows that people who have gum disease have a harder time controlling their blood sugar levels.
  • HIV/AIDS. Oral problems, such as painful mucosal lesions, are common in people who have HIV/AIDS.
  • Osteoporosis. Osteoporosis — which causes bones to become weak and brittle — might be linked with periodontal bone loss and tooth loss.
  • Alzheimer’s disease. Tooth loss before age 35 might be a risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease.
  • Other conditions. Other conditions that might be linked to oral health include Sjogren’s syndrome — an immune system disorder that causes dry mouth — and eating disorders.

Because of these potential links, be sure to tell your dentist if you’re taking any medications or have had any changes in your overall health — especially if you’ve had any recent illnesses or you have a chronic condition, such as diabetes.

How can I protect my oral health?

To protect your oral health, practice good oral hygiene every day. For example:

  • Brush your teeth at least twice a day.
  • Floss daily.
  • Eat a healthy diet and limit between-meal snacks.
  • Replace your toothbrush every three to four months or sooner if bristles are frayed.
  • Schedule regular dental checkups.

Also, contact your dentist as soon as an oral health problem arises. Remember, taking care of your oral health is an investment in your overall health.

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What Are Toothaches?

A toothache is pain that you feel in or around your tooth. Most often, toothache pain is a sign that there is something wrong with your tooth or gums. Sometimes, however, toothache pain is referred pain, meaning that the pain is caused by a problem elsewhere in your body.

You should never ignore toothaches. Toothaches caused by tooth decay can get worse if left untreated. Toothaches are usually not life threatening, but in some cases, they can be signs of serious conditions that require immediate medical treatment. If you are in the San Diego are looking for a dentist please call and schedule an appointment immediately with Orthodontic & General Dentistry in San Diego Ca. Call (619) 550-1111 or visit  https://plus.google.com/u/0/b/114254653842619176847/114254653842619176847/about

What Are Toothaches?

A toothache is pain that you feel in or around your tooth. Most often, toothache pain is a sign that there is something wrong with your tooth or gums. Sometimes, however, toothache pain is referred pain, meaning that the pain is caused by a problem elsewhere in your body.

You should never ignore toothaches. Toothaches caused by tooth decay can get worse if left untreated. Toothaches are usually not life threatening, but in some cases, they can be signs of serious conditions that require immediate medical treatment.

What Do Toothaches Feel Like?

Toothache pain can range from mild to severe, and may be constant or intermittent. You may feel:

  • throbbing pain in or around your tooth
  • sharp pain when you touch your tooth or bite down
  • tenderness and achiness in or around your tooth
  • painful sensitivity in your tooth in response to hot or cold foods and drinks
  • burning or shock-like pain (uncommon)

Underlying Causes of Toothaches

Common Causes of Toothaches

Tooth decay is the most common reason for toothaches. If tooth decay goes untreated, an abscess (an infection near your tooth or in the pulp inside your tooth) can develop. See your dentist right away if you think you have a dental abscess. In rare cases, the infection can spread to your brain, which can be life threatening.

A toothache can also be caused by an impacted tooth, which is when a tooth—usually a wisdom tooth—is stuck in your gum tissue or bone and cannot erupt (grow in).

Common Causes of Referred Pain Toothaches

Sinusitis is a condition in which your sinuses become inflamed due to a viral, bacterial, or fungal infection in the sinus cavity. Because the roots of your upper teeth are close to your sinuses, sinusitis can cause pain in your upper teeth.

Less Common Causes of Referred Pain Toothaches

Heart disease and lung cancer can cause toothaches, according to a 2010 entry in the journal General Dentistry (Myers DE, General Dentistry, 2010), and may be a warning sign of a heart attack. The vagus nerve is the reason heart and lung disease can cause toothache pain. This nerve runs from your brain to the different organs in your body, including your heart and lungs, passing through the jaw.

Rare Causes of Referred Pain Toothaches

Trigeminal neuralgia and occipital neuralgia are painful neurological conditions that cause the trigeminal and occipital nerves to become irritated or inflamed. These nerves service your skull, face, and teeth. When they become inflamed, pain can appear to be coming from the teeth.

When a Toothache Is an Emergency

Seek emergency treatment if you have a toothache as well as:

  • swelling in your jaw or face (your tooth infection may be spreading)
  • chest pain, shortness of breath, lightheadedness, or other signs of a heart attack
  • a cough that won’t go away, wheezing, or coughing up blood (may be signs of lung cancer)

Treating Toothaches

Toothaches usually require medical treatment. Home treatment may temporarily relieve your pain while you wait for your dentist or doctor’s appointment.

Dental Treatment

Most people go to a dentist for a toothache, since most toothaches are caused by problems with the teeth. Your dentist will do X-rays and a physical exam of your teeth to detect tooth decay and other dental problems.

Your dentist may give you painkillers and antibiotics to treat an infection, if necessary. If your toothache is due to tooth decay, your dentist will remove the decay with a drill and fill the space with dental materials. An impacted tooth may require surgical removal. If your dentist cannot find the cause of your toothache, he or she may refer you to a doctor for further diagnosis and treatment.

Sinusitis Treatment

Your doctor may treat sinusitis with antibiotics or decongestant medications, and in rare cases with surgery to open your nasal passages.

Treatment for Trigeminal Neuralgia and Occipital Neuralgia

There is no cure for these conditions. Treatment usually consists of relieving your pain with medications.

Treatment for Heart Attack, Heart Disease, and Lung Cancer

If your dentist suspects that you are having a heart attack, he or she will send you to the emergency room. If your dentist suspects that you have heart or lung disease, he will refer you to a doctor for further testing.

Home Treatment

Things that may help temporarily relieve your tooth pain include:

  • over-the-counter pain relievers, such as aspirin
  • clove oil applied to the aching tooth
  • Anbesol, Orajel, or other over-the-counter topical dental pain relievers
  • over-the-counter decongestants, such as Sudafed, if the pain is due to sinus congestion

How to Prevent Toothaches

To help prevent toothaches, brush and floss your teeth at least twice a day and get dental checkups and cleanings twice a year, or as often as recommended by your dentist.

You can help keep your heart and lungs healthy by not smoking, eating a low-fat and high-fiber diet, and exercising at least 30 minutes a day, three times a week. Get your doctor’s permission before starting an exercise routine.

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