Tooth, teeth, oral pain. What is it?

Symptom: Sensitivity to hot or cold foods and liquids.

 

Possible problem: If discomfort lasts only moments, sensitivity generally does not signal a serious problem. It may be caused by; a small area of decay in a tooth, a loose filling or an exposed root surface resulting from gum recession and possibly toothbrush abrasion.

What to do: If a root surface is sensitive, keep it clean and free of dental bacterial plaque. Use a soft toothbrush, cleaning very gently at the gum line, and brush no more than twice daily. Try using fluoride-containing toothpaste made for sensitive teeth. You can even try using toothpaste like an ointment, rubbing it into the root surface for ten minutes or so at a time. If the sensitivity continues, see your dentist.

Symptom: Sensitivity to hot or cold foods after dental treatment.

 

Possible problem: Dental work may result in tooth sensitivity due to inflammation of the pulp tissues inside a tooth.

What to do: This sensitivity should last no longer then a few days; however, if decay has recently been removed or a filling or crown recently has been placed, a tooth may take a week or two to settle. Mild pain relievers like acetaminophen, aspirin or ibuprofen should help. If the pain persists or worsens, see your dentist.

Symptom: Sharp pain when biting down on food.

 

Possible problem: Decay, a loose filling and/or a cracked tooth are possible causes.

What to do: See a dentist to diagnose the problem before the pain worsens. Decay will need to be removed, and a loose filling replaced by your dentist. If the pain is caused by pulp tissue damage, your dentist may send you to an endodontist (“endo” – inside; “dont” – tooth), a specialist who will perform a root canal treatment to clean out the damaged pulp, disinfect the root canal and fill and seal the remaining space to save the tooth. A cracked tooth may be difficult to treat not only if it involves the pulp, but also depending on the location and depth of the crack. (See the Dear Doctormagazine article on “Cracked Tooth Syndrome”)

Symptom: Lingering pain after eating hot or cold foods and liquids.

 

Possible problem: This probably means the pulp is inflamed and/or dying, and may be irreversibly damaged usually as a result of deep decay or physical trauma.

What to do: See your dentist or endodontist to diagnose the problem before the pain becomes severe due to the development of an abscess. The tooth will likely need root canal treatment to remove the dying or dead pulp tissue to save the tooth.

Floor of the sinus

Symptom: Dull ache and pressure in the upper teeth and sinus area of one or both sides.

 

Possible problem: Pain felt in the sinus area of the face is often associated with the upper back teeth because they share the same nerves. The origin of this “referred” pain consequently may be difficult to determine. Therefore, sinus pain can feel like tooth pain and vice versa. That’s why sinus congestion from a cold or flu can cause pain in the upper teeth. Additionally it’s also important to determine if clenching or grinding is a factor, as they too cause similar symptoms.

What to do: See your dentist or endodontist to find out if the symptoms are dentally related; otherwise, you may need to see your family physician. However, don’t wait until the pain worsens.

Schedule An Emergency Appointment: http://www.24-7emergencydental.com/

858.552.0052

 

 

 

Holiday Dental Care Tips

  1. Avoid Desserts and SweetsOkay well maybe don’t avoid the sweets. The party may offer a multitude of sugary snacks and holiday desserts, but don’t forget that drinks like eggnog, hot cocoa, punch and most liqueurs contain a high level of sugars. Take a quick trip to the restroom and brush. By limiting your consumption, you can deter unwanted tooth decay while reducing any harmful effects to your waistline.
  2. Try Not to StressIf the season is stressing you out, you may find yourself grinding or clinching your teeth during stressful situations and often while you sleep. This can cause headaches and jaw pain, as well as damaged teeth and dental work. The best way to address this problem is to use a dental mouth guard, which won’t stop the grinding but can prevent it from causing pain.
  3. Don’t Forget Your ToothbrushHoliday parties with friends and family are about gathering together where lots of food and beverages are on hand. By bringing a toothbrush, toothpaste and dental floss, you can periodically excuse yourself to take care of your teeth. If you cannot do this, at least try to rinse your mouth with water between dinner courses or chew sugar-less gums.
  4. Have an Emergency Dental ContactThe wrong bite into a candy cane can result in a dental disaster. You may chip a tooth, lose a filling, or break a crown while on vacation or when the dentist’s office is closed. Contact Dr. Kasari’s office to see if they can provide you with emergency dental care over the holiday season.
  5. Take Care of Your TeethThe holiday fun can keep you distracted, but as long as your oral health care becomes a habit, you can continue the holiday fun without fretting about your teeth. Make a resolution to brush and floss regularly and schedule routine check ups with your dentist.

If you are in the San Diego area this season for the holidays we are here for all you’re emergency dental needs.

 

Toothache 101

A toothache is a pain in or around a tooth that may be caused by:

Symptoms of a toothache may include:

  • Tooth pain that may be sharp, throbbing, or constant. In some people, pain results only when pressure is applied to the tooth.
  • Swelling around the tooth
  • Fever or headache
  • Foul-tasting drainage from the infected tooth

    When Should I See a Dentist About a Toothache?

    See your dentist as soon as possible about your toothache if:

    • You have a toothache that lasts longer than 1 or 2 days
    • Your toothache is severe
    • You have a fever, earache, or pain upon opening your mouth wide

    Proper identification and treatment of dental infections is important to prevent its spread to other parts of the face and skull and possibly even to the bloodstream.

    What Happens When I Go to the Dentist for a Toothache?

    To treat your toothache, your dentist will first obtain your medical history and conduct a physical exam. He or she will ask you questions about the pain, such as when the pain started, how severe it is, where the pain is located, what makes the pain worse, and what makes it better. Your dentist will examine your mouth, teeth, gums, jaws, tongue, throat, sinuses, ears, nose, and neck. X-rays may be taken as well as other tests, depending on what your dentist suspects is causing your toothache.

    What Treatments Are Available for a Toothache?

    Treatment for a toothache depends on the cause. If a cavity is causing the toothache, your dentist will fill the cavity or possibly extract the tooth, if necessary. A root canal might be needed if the cause of the toothache is determined to be an infection of the tooth’s nerve. Bacteria that have worked their way into the inner aspects of the tooth cause such an infection. An antibiotic may be prescribed if there is fever or swelling of the jaw. Occasionally, phototherapy with a cold laser, usually in conjunction with another treatment, may be used to reduce the pain and inflammation associated with the toothache.

    How Can Toothaches Be Prevented?

    Since most toothaches are the result of tooth decay, following good oral hygiene practices can prevent toothaches. Good oral hygiene practices consist of brushing regularly with a fluoride-containing toothpaste, flossing once daily, rinsing once or twice a day with an antiseptic mouthwash, and seeing your dentist twice a year for professional cleaning. In addition to these practices, eat foods low in sugar and ask your dentist about sealants and fluoride applications.

Book Appointment today

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/guide/toothaches for more on toothaches